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September 28, 2010
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Unlettered Comics Page by Huwman Unlettered Comics Page by Huwman
The original, unretouched inks for a page of my comic series/graphic novel that is in (slow) progress. A few more pages:

[link]


[link]


[link]

All drawn with a Winsor Newton Series 7 #2 brush. Thanks for looking!
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:iconyowassup:
yowassup Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
really liking this!!

ah, good old winsor newton.
that really takes me back.
for a while i used a winsor newton... i think i was using a #1... years ago... before i got addicted to my 0.25 technical pen.
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:iconhuwman:
Huwman Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2012  Professional
Actually, after years of using WN brushes, I discovered Raphael brushes and I use them almost exclusively now. They are amazing.
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:iconyowassup:
yowassup Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I learned about Windsor Newton from an interview with Mike Allred. Apparently that's what he uses. If I were still into brushes, I'd give the Raphael a try, though. It's always fun to experiment.

My love for brushes started when I did a two year stint here in Japan at a school that teaches Japanese painting. There I was introduced to all sorts of funky brushes for inking. They have an incredibly long history of brushes in Japan, mainly derived and appropriated from the even longer history of brushes in China. It's absolutely insane how many different types of brushes they have even for just making lines. On the other hand, oil painting brushes are relatively new here, and I assume most oil painters use Western brushes.

I can't remember the name of my favorite Japanese brush for making lines, but it was basically like the Windsor Newton except it was a lot more soft and pliable, which can be good or bad depending on your personal preference, I guess. Anyhow, after I finished that Japanese painting program and got back into my cartooning hobby, I used that Japanese line brush for a looooong time and enjoyed it a lot. Until I read that Mike Allred interview and made the change.

Now I am addicted to technical pens because of the amount of control they give. They remind me so much of ball point and pencil, which are the two things I "grew up on."

But I still LOVE looking at good brushwork. Like yours. Awesome stuff! Thanks!!
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:iconhuwman:
Huwman Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Professional
Thanks, man. W&N are still very popular but I have to say the Raphaels beat them in many ways, at least in my opinion. I believe Will Eisner and some of the older comic artists used Japanese brushed because they were relatively cheap.
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:iconyowassup:
yowassup Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Interesting. I'll have to file that info about Raphaels in the back of my mind for that day when I get a hankering to get back into brushwork. Right now, when I do get the hankering to use a brush, I generally use a Pentel refillable brush pen. I don't know if you know about these, but they are totally awesome. Unlike the common felt tip brush pen, these are actually made from hair like fibers. So while a Pentel brush is not going to be as cool as a traditional brush made from real animal hair, it is amazingly more similar to a traditional brush than a felt tip brushpen. It has a refillable reservoir in the handle. The cool thing is you can draw with them anywhere, because you don't have to worry about the mess that comes with dipping into an ink bottle. You can literally take paper and your Pentel brush with you to a cafe and do brushwork there. Or work in any room of the house, if, like me, you have to fulfill fatherly duties of watching a kid while drawing. It is amazing.

That is interesting to hear about a possible connection between Eisner and Japanese brushes. I'd like to research about that more some time. I do know that the insanely huge array of Japanese painting brushes available here contain a lot of very expensive brushes, so I am a little surprised to hear that they were a cheaper option...
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:iconhuwman:
Huwman Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2012  Professional
I think I first read about Eisner and his "stable" using cheap Japanese brushes in this book discussed here: [link],
As I recall, they apparently didn't snap/spring back like standard sable brushes, so they took some getting used to but Eisner and Fine sure got some great results out of them!
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:iconcubist1234:
cubist1234 Featured By Owner May 10, 2011
Great work. It reminds me of Will Elder and John Severin and their work in the early MAD.
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:iconhuwman:
Huwman Featured By Owner May 10, 2011  Professional
You certainly know the right things to say to an "oldschool" comics guy like me - thanks! I wasn't sure who you were at first but then I checked your gallery and I remember finding a lot of things to fave in there a while back. Great stuff and right up my alley.

Since you are obviously a fan of the old comics, you might be especially interested in my current journal and the photo collage (link at bottom of journal)

I am watching you back, young fella! (I won't say how old I am but, according to your profile, our combined ages would be 91 which is probably about equal to the combined ages 5 or 6 usual Deviants!)
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:iconcubist1234:
cubist1234 Featured By Owner May 10, 2011
Well, my gallery is a mishmash of pretentious digital art, some paintings, and comic art done in slavish love for Golden and Silver Age comics. I think this is the best time in my life, for the computer tools are something that I don't take for granted, and they appeal to the teenager who never grew older. I know that I saw your work outside of DeviantArt and I am certain now that I have seen your gallery. My graphic novel is coming along slowly but surely and is intended to pay tribute to B Movies and 50s science fiction comics. I am glad to correspond with other artists because it inspires me to get off my duff and do more. Your art has a great retro feel, and it is the traditional abilities of the older cartoonist that seem to be lost today. They bled india ink! I rarely read new comics but I always have time for old EC and old Marvel and DC and Charlton. If I were to pick my favorites, I would say Williamson, Wood, Davis, Kirby, Ditko, and Robert Crumb. And I did get an autograph and poster from Al Feldstein and I thanked him for his work. Best wishes!
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:iconhuwman:
Huwman Featured By Owner May 11, 2011  Professional
Sounds like we're on the same page - and it's probably one in an old comic! I'm amazed at how many people met Al Williamson, although I never had the pleasure. "Slowly but surely" describes the progress on my comic series/graphic novel too - at least the "slowly" part. And it is also heavily influenced by old B movies, as well as pre-code comics. I'm looking forward to readinging your graphic novel and I'm glad to see a few other people on here that don't do manga!
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